Programming

Jennifer Judelsohn offers a variety of programming opportunities including workshops, retreats, and seminars.  Her programs include Artist-in-Residence, Workshops, Teacher Training and Family Education, and more.

Jennifer will work with appropriate stakeholders within your organization to tailor a program to fit your organization’s interests, needs, and budget. Programs can be easily scaled, depending on the desires of the organization, from an hour-long presentation, to a day-long program, to intensive weekend to a week-long series of activities, to a month-long or even year-long program.

As an artist, educator, psychotherapist, and nationally and internationally acclaimed presenter and speaker, Jennifer has created original programming that fits a wide variety of organizational audiences.

Contact Jennifer to schedule a workshop, presentation, retreat, or seminar for your group or event!

Working with Jennifer Judelsohn is always a gift.  She thinks out of the box to create projects and curriculum for students in both formal and informal settings.  She has the uncanny ability to develop projects that support what is being taught.

Jennifer’s ability to engage students of various ages is amazing, she knows how to motivate students to think and to produce work that exceeds even their wildest expectations.

Over the years, I have found myself consulting again and again with Jennifer; once you start working with her, you will do the same.

Chava Gal-Or

Director of Congregational Learning, Temple Sinai, Houston TX

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Artist in Residence Programs

An Artist-in-Residence program can help build cohesion, enhance communication, improve collaboration, and foster innovation and new ideas within any group or organization—in a fun, dynamic way.

Schools, religious congregations, community organizations, nonprofits, and corporations can benefit from an Artist-in-Residence program.

As Artist-in-Residence, Jennifer Judelsohn incorporates four basic elements into the programming she provides:

  • Consciousness—intention, visioning, meditation, learning, etc.
  • Creativity—drawing, painting, mixed media, sculpture, writing, movement/dance, etc.
  • Community—integration of multiple internal communities into a coherent whole
  • Connection—intra-group connections, connections with the community, bridge-building, etc.

Jennifer’s Artist-in-Residence programming typically focuses on a particular theme of the group’s choosing. She works with appropriate stakeholders within your group to tailor the program to fit your group’s interests, needs, and budget.

Her approach also enables her to easily scale your program, depending on the desires of your group—from a half-day workshop or seminar, to an intensive weekend, a week-long series of activities, to a month-long or even year-long program.

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Artist in Residence Programming Examples
“The Eagle Soars”: Elementary School Artist-in-Residence Project
Location:        Beverly Farms Elementary School, Potomac, Maryland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of Participants: Approximately 600

Grades:          K–5

Project Summary:

The project involved the creation of a large, four-canvas mural (measuring 8 feet x10 feet) with an image of an eagle with outstretched wings. Beverly Farms students created individual small circles of art that when collaged together formed the eagle. This mural was installed in a prominent location in the school (near the front entrance) where students, teachers, and visitors can see it.

The Artist-in-Residence painted a colored background on four large canvases (each 48” x 60”) and created a grid outline of a large eagle with outstretched wings on the background. The eagle was the primary image for this piece because it is the Beverly Farms Elementary School mascot.

Students worked together to paint backgrounds on large sheets of paper that were then cut/torn into interesting shapes and collaged onto the canvases. After learning about the eagle as a symbol for the United States and what the eagle symbolizes in other cultures, each student created a mandala (on a 3” circle) about what “eagle” means to them. These mandalas were then collaged onto the eagle outline, as the eagle’s “feathers”.

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City of Fairfax Day Camps Artist-in-Residence Program
Location:       Daniels Run Elementary School, Providence Elementary School, Lanier Middle School, Green Acres Community Center: Fairfax, Virginia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of Participants: Approximately 600 campers

Grades:          Pre-school through teen

Project Summary:

Because Fairfax, Virginia, is known as “Tree City,” that was the theme of the program. Working with the Artist-in-Residence, the campers created a communal piece of art, through the combination of individual campers’ small pieces of art. Each camper created their own leaf, as well as working together to create backgrounds, and other aspects of nature. All of these components were then collaged onto two large canvases, creating a whimsical, delightful mural of trees, flowers, grasses, birds, insects, and animals. When the diptych was completed, it was installed in the Stacy Sherwood Community Center for a public unveiling.

Campers learned that trees represent life, growth, beauty, and sustainability; that the city of Fairfax is a vibrant, livable community; that small individual contributions, when combined together, create a whole that is greater than the sum of its parts; and that in community, each individual matters.

 

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Rapides Cancer Center and Cabrini Cancer Center

Location:       Rapides Cancer Center and Cabrini Cancer Center, Alexandria, Louisiana

Number of Participants: Patients, family members, caregivers, doctors, nurses, administrative staff, friends

Participants:          Community-at-large

Project Summary:

In this “drop-in” program, participants explored the difference between healing—an internal process, by and for themselves, that restores balance and harmony to body, mind, and spirit—and curing (what medical science attempts to do through medication, treatment, or other external intervention).

After a discussion of the process, they created small individual pieces of art—reflecting their visions of hope and healing for themselves or loved ones—that were combined into larger communal pieces that were hung in the cancer centers. Through this process, healing occurred, community was built, participants experienced a sense of joy and creative expression—and they felt hope shining through.

 

Religious School Artist-in-Residence Program
Location:       Hebrew Educational Alliance Religious School, Denver, Colorado

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of Participants: Approximately 150

Grades:          K-5

Project Summary:

Through text study and creative writing and art processes, students developed a deeper, more personal understanding of the Shema—the foundational expression of Jews’ faith in the One God—and collectively created a large-scale piece of wall-art that meaningfully and beautifully expresses what they learned individually and collectively.

Students were separated into three groups by grade: K–1, 2–3, and 4–5. Each group worked with the Artist-In-Residence to explore the Shema and what it means to them. Each group parsed out meanings of the Shema—word by word, and even letter by letter.

Each student then created their own small piece of art containing their own interpretation and “translation” of the Shema. Then each group collectively collaged their individual pieces of art onto one of the three letters of the Hebrew word Shema, (shin, mem, ayin). The finished mural hangs in the hallway of the Religious School wing of the synagogue.

 

 

Artist-in-Residence After School Youth Program for the City of Alexandria

Location:       Martin Community Center, Alexandria, Louisiana

Number of Participants: variable

Grades:          Elementary – middle school

Project Summary:

In this after-school program, participants created mandalas—artwork in the form of a circle—representing their self-identity, including their values, dreams, and/or goals. After an easy guided visualization exercise, the children used simple materials and drawing and collaging techniques to create art depicting the symbol(s) they received in their visualization.

 

 

Summer Institute Artist-in-Residence Program

Location:       Franklin Pierce University, 
Rindge, New Hampshire

Number of Participants: 300 overall; 20 in week-long intensive class (ages 24 – 80)

Participants:          Community-at-large

Project Summary:

During this week-long institute, the Artist-in-Residence provided multi-faceted experiential programming for the entire community of 300 attendees, including a week-long intensive course for 20 participants, as well as programming for the Kids Camp and the community at large.

Through text study, discussion, journaling, meditation, and hands-on artmaking, participants explored the Jewish concept of teshuvah from a variety of perspectives and levels. The class was designed to enable participants to go deep within themselves, based on self-generated intention. The artist-in-residence taught the mandala process, which entails drawing within the form of a circle, using colored pencils on black paper. By the end of the course, each of the 20 participants had created several luminous, radiant images that reflected their own sacred center and developed a spiritual practice that they could use in their daily lives.
Each class session began with a group exercise to create intention and sacred space. Participants then engaged in partnered study of texts specifically selected for that session—based on a specific theme—followed by a group discussion. The next element of each session was a guided meditation/visualization, based on an intention that related to the theme of that day’s session. Using the experience of that meditation, students then drew the images they envisioned. At the end of each day’s class, the participants had the opportunity to share and discuss their experience with the group.
The course also incorporated other expressive modalities, including journaling, chanting, and movement. All of these art forms provided avenues for participants to both access and express their sacred centers and to deepen their personal practice and their spiritual connection to Judaism, to the theme of the class, and to the Institute as a whole.

Community Programming:
To connect the participants in the week-long intensive course with the rest of the Institute community, a temporary “gallery” was set up to display the course participants’ artwork and encourage conversation between them and other Institute attendees about the experience and the process. The gallery remained open and available to all Institute attendees throughout the week.
The Artist-in-Residence also led a community-wide activity—“Praying Your Neighbor’s Prayer”—at the Institute’s opening plenary gathering. This activity was based on the communal nature of prayer in Judaism and designed to connect Institute attendees with each other in an innovative, intimate, yet safe way. To begin, attendees broke into small groups for discussion about the concept of “returning.” The groups wrote their ideas on paper, which they posted on the walls around the room—creating “wordles” or “word clouds.” These “wordles” provided a jumping-off point for each individual attendee to write, on a small circle, their own personal prayer (without writing their name on it). Each attendee then exchanged her or his prayer with another person. They then walked around the room and exchanged the prayer they were then holding with someone else. After four more exchanges (for a total of six), each attendee was holding a prayer that was written by someone they probably didn’t know. Attendees were then invited to “pray their neighbor’s prayer.” That invitation applied not only to that moment, but extended to the entire remainder of the Institute.
In addition, the Artist-in-Residence led a program for the Kids’ Camp called “A Million Mandalas for Peace.” The basic idea was to invite campers to explore the idea of peace through a guided inquiry/meditation, from the most macro, global perspective down to the personal level. The framing questions were these: What would it look like if the whole world lived in peace? What would it look like if all nations lived in peace? What would it look like if all states, cities, towns lived in peace? What would it look like if all neighborhoods lived in peace? What would it look like if all families lived in peace? What would it look like if you lived your whole life in peace? The Artist-in-Residence guided the campers through a meditation in which they accessed their own personal symbol for peace. They then drew their symbol, within the form of a circle. The artwork the campers created was displayed in a Community Gallery so that all Institute attendees could see the visions of peace created by the youngest members of the community.

 

 

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Workshops

Jennifer develops and leads workshops on a variety of subjects including: Judaism, spirituality, psychotherapy, art therapy, the mandala process, art and healing, and more.

Interfaith Programs

Jennifer develops and leads classes, workshops, seminars, and other programs on a variety of subjects relating to Judaism, Jewish education, and spirituality around the United States at multiple CAJE conferences including CAJE (2003-2011), Women’s League for Conservative Judaism–Seaboard Chapter (2004), and ALEPH Kallah (2005), and Limmud conferences (2003 and 2005) in England.

She also presents numerous sessions on spirituality and psychotherapy, art therapy, and other topics at international conferences of the U.S. and Canadian Societies for Spirituality and Social Work. Additional presentations and workshops include “Sacred Circles” at the National Cathedral and presentations on the mandala process, conference presentations on art and healing, and others.

She has led a group of seventh grade students from Kehillat Shalom Congregation in Gaithersburg, Maryland, in writing and winning a grant from Jewish Youth Philanthropy Institute for pilot program that brought together local Jewish, Christian, and Muslim teens for a discussion and program hosted by Kehillat Shalom (2006).

Jennifer won a CAJE Grant for Innovation in Jewish Education for the “Children of Abraham” program, which brought together middle school students from Jewish, Christian, and Islamic communities in Montgomery County, Maryland, for discussions and activities (2007). She made a presentation about the program at the 2007 CAJE Conference in St. Louis.
She conceptualized and led community Women’s Seders from 1998 through 2006, including creating haggadot; she presented a three-part workshop about this experience at the 2005 Limmud conference in Nottingham, England.
She presents talks on “Judaism 101” to non-Jewish organizations such as church groups.

Lunch & Learn

Jennifer develops and leads Lunch and Learn Experiential Family Education Programs. Programs include topics such as: “Why is 4 So Important? Exploring the 4s of Passover: Lunch and Learn Experiential Family Education Program for 3rd-5th Graders and Parents”

In this program, students and parents learn about the significance of the number 4 in the Passover Seder, explore the relevance of the Passover story and celebration to their lives today, and develop an understanding of how creating family rituals and traditions enhances their experience of their religious heritage. Each family unit creates an individually hand-decorated table runner incorporating visual elements of the Passover Seder to be used for years to come during their own family Passover celebrations.

The program begins with an ice-breaker exercise that enables participants to meet and greet each other and engage with the subject matter of the program. Everyone gets a handout with a 4×4 grid with an item in each square. Examples are “someone who has four siblings” or “someone who can recite the Four Questions.” The goal of the game is to have the name of a different individual in each square that meets the criteria for that square.

During lunch, each table has cards with “Table Talk” conversation starters. Cards include texts and/or intriguing questions for group study. Periodically during the meal, participants are asked to share their table’s thoughts with the whole group.

Each family group receives a piece of fabric to decorate. Using fabric markers, they create a runner using graphic symbols to represent the four children, four cups of wine, and four questions. The runners encapsulate what they learned about each of these “Fours” in the Passover seder. Each family completes their project during the program and took it home with them to use at their own family seders.

Your Amazing Life: A Vision Board Workshop

Jennifer’s Your Amazing Life vision boarding workshops are based on the premise that everyone is living their own journey, but life doesn’t come with a roadmap. Life is what you make it. In this workshop, participants envision and create a roadmap for whatever is the next phase of their life. Making a vision board enables participants to explore possibilities, get unstuck, work through transitions, and explore new directions for their life. Working in a group is a powerful way to inspire one another to dream and manifest each other’s most miraculous life.

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Training Programs

Jennifer has extensive experience in teaching and develops and leads teacher training and professional development workshops.

Jennifer develops and leads teacher training and professional development workshops for a wide range of clients from major corporations to leading religious institutions.   Her classes typically incorporate artistic and expressive modalities of teaching, learning, and assessment.  Jennifer uses spiritual concepts from multiple traditions to help participants apply skills to raise awareness, create change and improve their lives and the world around them.

Jennifer has planned, developed, and led numerous Family Education programs for multiple institutions in the Washington, D.C., area.  She has extensive experience teaching in numerous public and congregational religious schools, working with students from pre-K through high school.

Jennifer develops and leads teacher training and professional development workshops for religious institutions including the Board of Jewish Education in Buffalo, New York, and the Partnership for Jewish Life and Learning in the metropolitan Washington, D.C., area, as well as at individual congregations around the country.

Jennifer develops and teaches wellness and stress reduction workshops for corporate and professional event/convention clients in the Northern Virginia area.

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Interested in Learning More?

Would you like additional information about Jennifer’s programs?
Would you like to schedule a workshop, presentation, retreat, or seminar for your group or event?

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